Social media age: reminiscing on the years of locust

The locust of social media has begun what seems to be our end, but we appear to be unworried. Is it not sufficient to say that social media is the locust in disguise?

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By Yusuf Bello

It is the locust, a thief that indiscriminately robs plant even in the daylight to the utter surprise of the farm owners. What could the helpless farmer have done? Neither trap nor trick could control the escapade once the team appeared.

The mystery in the intrusion of the locust is hidden in large number with which it attacked games and rendered every plant useless within a little time.

What it takes to own a farm, the pains involved, sleepless nights, hard work and all, disappeared in a moment.

The farm owner who had prepared for a boastful harvest, thus, humbled into debts by the attack of the intruder. Fortunately for the farmers, the teeming locusts disappeared, at last, and the time to gain bumper harvest began.

Alas! The age of locust has returned but this time around, not to feast on plant nor destroy farms and anything thereof; it has reappeared to feed on the future of this nation. It has caught us unaware and has eaten deeply into the fabrics of the youths of this country, robbing us of valuable time.

It is promoting societal evil, engineering moral decadence, breaking homes and weakening our sense of commitment to goals.

The locust of social media has begun what seems to be our end, but we appear to be unworried. Is it not sufficient to say that social media is the locust in disguise?

If the locust had remained the major threat that bedeviled our forefathers in the years of locust, the worry remains strong in the mind that social media is attacking us in strength, taking our senses and weakening our approaches to issues. The serpent has not cunningly crept in to intrude our senses and time alone, it has eaten up our reasoning too, much to have reawaken ourselves to practical reality.

Procrastination has overtaken the real goals and our important schedules are thrown aside with a mere wave of hand.

Apparently, the time spent on social media could have meant a lot; to reflect, to take important actions and seek vital information through reading.

Time to run to the age of common sense is ripe; we cannot afford to leave our destinies in the gallery of slavery, premeditated by the time-stealing social media. The morals, sense of mission and attention to goals should return.

The best story is the one told by an achiever, and not by someone whose farm had been consumed by social media locust.

Yusuf Bello is a graduate of Linguistics and Communication Studies, Osun State University, Osogbo. He writes from Abuja, Nigeria.

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